Save The Trees

Witness to the destruction
Let Your Voice Be Heard - Contact Officials

Contact Information

TimberWest Forest Corp.
Third Floor,
856 Homer Street
Vancouver, BC 
Canada V6B 2W5
Phone: (604) 654-4600
Fax: (604) 654-4571 

Elected Officials

Members of the Legislative Assembly of B.C.
CLICK HERE
to find your local MLA's contact addresses

Even today with most of Vancouver Island's most productive old growth forests already logged, 3/4 of coastal forest logging is of ancient forests. Over 3/4 of that is done by the most destructive (but most profitable) method available - clear cut logging.

Oversight in our forests is being diminished by the very people entrusted to care for them with future generations and wilderness in mind. Because of the lack of government care for the public interest, our original forests continue to disappear.

The government's pro-industry mandate for our Crown forests is to maintain a commercial supply of 'fibre', and protect investor interests. The citizens did not approve this change in mandate, nor did the endangered species that are disappearing due to habitat destruction.

Lower Avatar Grove, Port Renfrew
We can let government and industry know that we care about our forests, and demand they be utilized in a sustainable fashion for a variety of stakeholders. Our oldest trees are disappearing, and with them go wilderness, diversity, water-cleaning capabilities, carbon storage, soil retention, air quality, cultures and jobs.

It is time to take back our trees and forests before they are sold off for fibre farms, whole log exports, and residential development. Contact corporate and elected officials and let them know how you feel about the ongoing profit-driven destruction and enclosure of our public forests.

Want To Do More?
  • say NO to single use paper products like paper towels, cups, tissue...
  • phone Yellow Pages and tell them not to deliver to your house
  • develop a personal connection to the ancient forest - gently visit the trees
  • do not buy old growth wood
  • boycott endangered B.C. cedar which is being harvested unsustainably
  • spread the word - tell others about the state of our forests
  • press the government for action on endangered species and habitat destruction
  • go paperless with your monthly bills
  • donate to a group working to protect old growth forests
  • if your community does not have a tree protection bylaw, suggest one
  • consider quitting the toilet paper habit (millions of trees are cut annually to feed our habit - consider using water and reusable cloth wipes)
  • use only 100% post consumer content if you use toilet paper
  • speak out against helicopter logging which is taking some of the last remaining big trees from previously inaccessible areas

11 comments:

  1. Anonymous7/3/19

    It would be helpful if you would add a link to a Canadian source where we can buy seedlings of the endangered trees. I'm sure there are lots of people who''d buy them and transplanted them. It might be hard to stop the cutting down of trees, but no one will stop someone from planting trees. We just need the sources of seedlings or cones identified. Thanks

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  2. Thank you to the person that commented here to ask about suppliers of tree seeds. The comment got lost in moderation, but I am posting a link to some British Columbia seed suppliers.

    We CAN stop the cutting down of our ancient forests, as has been shown many times by caring activists that are willing to wage a "War In The Woods", among other activities that work.

    But that does not mean that we can't also plant trees in great numbers. Why not plant trees everywhere we can?

    https://npsbc.files.wordpress.com/2017/12/nativeplantnurseriesandseedsuppliersinbc.pdf

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    Replies
    1. Just be sure that “everywhere we can” just means where those tree species naturally grow, meaning within their natural range and that if you plant seedlings you aren’t accidentally spreading agricultural pests. Humans are also destroying forests and whole ecosystems by planting species where they don’t belong and by spreading invasive plant pathogens....

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  3. Hi Myles! I'd love to talk to you about making a short film. Can you send me an email? Love this blog.

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  4. Hello. Just a test. My last two posts went missing.?? Maybe I'm not verified enough? Tried to do captcha thing but did not receive email. Will try Google account route rather than name and url. Hopeful, I go.

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  5. Hi there! I was inspired by the previous posts to attempt to post myself. It appears to be working now so here goes.
    I'm lucky enough to have access to quite a number of native tree seedlings on an East Sooke property. The ones easiest to transplant are between 1-4 yrs old.

    There are Red Cedar, Douglas Fir, Hemlock, Spruce, Alder,and Broad Leaf Maple in various quantities.
    Also, Salal, Oregon Grape, Huckleberries, Ocean Spray, Salmon and Thimble Berries,and more.

    At a Victoria location there are Garry Oaks, Arbutus, and Snowberries.

    There's also some duff infused with Mycorrhizal fungus and epiphytic moss,lichen and liverworts to innoculate the replanting sites.

    I'd really like to find carefully considered locations for replanting and long term care.

    I transplanted about 50-60 with a small group of mostly kids a year ago but a repeat didn't happen due to Covid 19.

    I'm hoping to connect with any people interested in some small scale, responsible, replanting collaborations in the next few months. Or even to simply discuss the concepts and processes involved.
    I feel we need to establish some "MicroArks" consisting of groups of trees and their associated flora and fauna that are carefully considered and cared for.

    They will provide examples to be replicated thus beginning the regrowth of truly natural forests for perpetuity.

    Thanks for your interest!

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  6. Oh my, is there a time period before the post shows? Another test...

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    Replies
    1. Yes, comments are moderated to eliminate spam. This may take a while, but we always get to it. Thank you for your interest in our blog, and for adding to it.

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    2. I would like to support your efforts, and will post your comment on the blog for all to see. It is definitely something I would have loved to participate in when I lived on Billing Spit in Sooke.

      What is the best way for people to get ahold of you if they are interested in your project?

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    3. Thanks for your interest! paul@spectrafocus.ca 250-899-9285

      I usually like to undertake things with a relaxed anticipation rather than fixed expectations. Rather like an artistic collaboration with no rigid agenda or method but always seeking informed quality.
      Cheers!

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  7. I'm hoping there is still time and possibility to stop the destruction of trees for a planned development in James Bay, and perhaps this is a good place to reach out for people to try to do something.

    I am quite upset that the City gave approval for the 24-unit townhouse complex at 415-435 Michigan St. which will see the removal of three very large, perhaps old-growth, trees at the street-side of the property. They are marked with a large orange X on the side of the trees facing away from the street. Developers could work around them but this was apparently not a condition for the development approval.

    I believe there is limited time to bring attention to this pending devastation. I was told by an on-site worker today that the permits for the tree removal have not been given yet by the City of Victoria.

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